Before and after interracial

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June 12th marks the anniversary of the Supreme Court's Loving v. Virginia case that struck down laws prohibiting interracial marriage. More than fifty years later, it seems absurd to most of us that such laws ever existed in the first place. In June, many Americans marked Loving Day —an annual gathering to fight racial prejudice through a celebration of multiracial community.
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Key facts about race and marriage, 50 years after Loving v. Virginia

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Interracial Marriage Before And After The Historic Loving Decision

This story is part two of a special three-part series on interracial marriage. Winston Cox and Trudy Kofford were married late on a February afternoon in She was years-old, a green-eyed dreamer fresh from the hills of Oregon. He was 29, an ambitious doctoral candidate from Jamaica, with a wiry build. Trudy, who is white, wore a wool dress with a rounded straw hat in honor of her mother, one of a tiny number of family members present for the couple that day.
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Intermarriage in the U.S. 50 Years After Loving v. Virginia

On July 11, , newlyweds Richard and Mildred Loving were asleep in bed when three armed police officers burst into the room. The couple were hauled from their house and thrown into jail, where Mildred remained for several days, all for the crime of getting married. At that time, 24 states across the country had laws strictly prohibiting marriage between people of different races. Five weeks earlier, the longtime couple had learned Mildred was pregnant and decided to wed in defiance of the law.
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By Gretchen Livingston and Anna Brown. In the racial and ethnic classification system used for this report, individuals are classified first by ethnicity defined as whether someone is Hispanic or not and then by race. As such, all references to whites, blacks, Asians, American Indians, multiracial persons or persons of some other race include those who are not Hispanic; Hispanics may be of any race. By the same token, if a Hispanic black person marries a non-Hispanic white person, their marriage would be classified as one between a Hispanic and a white person rather than a black and a white person. Beginning with the census, individuals could choose to identify with more than one group in response to the race question.